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Meet Adana

It starts when they're thirsty. You offer your child juice and it becomes their go-to drink. But when does pouring glasses of sugary beverages become hazardous to their health? For eight-year-old Adana, it was shortly after she turned five.

Pediatrician Natalia Golova, MD has been caring for Adana since she was an infant. Until her five-year physical, the girl had been growing on a normal growth curve. “Mom and dad have struggled with their weight, so I was aware of the genetic risks for Adana,” says Dr. Golova.

Meet Duncan

Like most 9-year-old boys, Duncan is full of energy. The youngest of three children, Duncan's love of swimming, reading, and building things is obvious in the first few moments you meet him.

But what’s less obvious is why Duncan has received treatment at our Center for Autism and Developmental Disabilities (CADD) Partial Program.

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Meet Amy

Amy had a terrible secret: her mother's boyfriend was sexually abusing her. Just eight years old, the second-grader overcame her fear and told her mother—but her mom didn't believe her. That was almost worse than the abuse itself.

Amy was afraid not only for herself but for her three-year-old brother, Jimmy. Amy knew her mother had a terrible secret, too: Mom’s boyfriend was hitting her. Amy saw it happen when no one thought she was watching. At the first sign of violence, Amy hid Jimmy in a closet.


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Meet Daine

Most parents will go to the ends of the earth to get their children the help they need. Or in the case of Diana and Jason Johnson, about 4,500 miles—the distance from Anchorage, Alaska, to Providence, Rhode Island.

Their youngest son, Daine, suffered multiple bone fractures—nine by the time their little boy turned two years old. Doctors in Alaska couldn’t figure out what was wrong.


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Meet Rachel

FOR 16-YEAR-OLD RACHEL, IT BEGAN WITH SKIPPING LUNCH AT SCHOOL TO AVOID A CAFETERIA BULLY. AT HOME, HER DAD’S CANCER TREATMENT HAD INTERRUPTED THE FAMILY DINNER ROUTINE, SO RACHEL TOOK TO SKIPPING THAT MEAL, TOO.

Home and school no longer felt predictable to the teen. As the daily structure of her life crumbled, Rachel saw food as something she could be in charge of—that eating less made her stronger and in control.


Meet Grayson

Grayson Tibbetts was born without a soft spot on the top of his skull. By his one-month checkup, Grayson's head was becoming noticeably long and narrow.

His pediatrician suspected the baby had fused skull plates, known as sagittal craniosynostosis. If not corrected, the premature closure of skull plates can put dangerous pressure on the brain and cause skull deformity.

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